Is the End of Credit Card Signatures Here?

Credit card signatures are going away. You may have seen many articles delivering this news, and might wonder if it matters to you as a merchant. Ultimately, the decision on whether or not to accept signatures is up to you, so it’s important to understand the benefits of each option. In this article, I provide some insight into how and why credit card signatures are being phased out. Let’s start with the basics.

Read More

3 Reasons Why an SDK is a Necessity to Enable EMV for mPOS

Many independent software vendors (ISVs) across a wide range of industries, including retail, hotel & lodging, healthcare, etc., are building innovative mobile point of sale (mPOS) payment solutions. These solutions include mobile applications that allow merchants to run their business from a smartphone or tablet and are coupled with an mPOS card reader to accept card-based payments. To be able to accept payments, these applications must comply with the latest payment industry standards and be certified to securely accept EMV payments.

Read More

INFOGRAPHIC: State of EMV in the U.S.

Since the fraud liability shifted to merchants in the U.S. due to the EMV migration back in October 2015, a lot has changed for the payments industry. Adoption of chip cards is on the rise, and merchants and consumers are finally getting used to the more secure payment method. Let's take a look at how far we've come in the first two years since the EMV migration began:  

Read More

Destination EMV. Are We There Yet?

EMV (Europay, Mastercard, Visa) is finally hitting its stride in the United States. More than 600 million chip cards have been issued to U.S. consumers so far, and as of March 2017, roughly 39% of merchants were ready to adopt EMV. Small-to-medium businesses have had a slower transition compared to retailers like Target and Home Depot. Some giant retailers were among the first to migrate because of their largely publicized data breaches. Note that EMV does not protect the actual PAN data, it only authenticates the card being used and only encryption of the data at point of dip, swipe or tap can truly reduce the risk of card skimming. Additional factors that are still a barrier to EMV adoption include merchants’ expectations of high costs, slow certification, training requirements, and a belief that the risk of fraud is low enough already (mostly for lower fraud rate merchants such as restaurants and healthcare). Despite these issues, advancements are being made such as Visa’s Quick Chip program. This software update “enables customers to dip and remove their EMV chip card at checkout in about two seconds or less. They can even do so before the transaction is complete (while the salesperson is still ringing up the items).”

Read More

The State of EMV in the U.S.: What Can Merchants Do Two Years Later

It’s been two years since EMV liability shifted in the U.S., and we’ve come a long way in the payments industry. Both card issuers and merchants continue to work hard to help with the EMV migration.

Read More

Subscribe